older

— Important intelligence analysis —

melannen:

Headcanon: Abed only got his job at SHIELD as a spousal benefit when they recruited Troy for their gadgets division

Evidence, incontrovertible: When everything else in Fury’s car was broken, what was still 100% operational? THE AIR CONDITIONING.

Bunny, related: Abed meets Sam while visiting Troy in the hospital and explains to him, scene by scene, why he is definitely the lead in a romcom, not the sidekick in an action movie.

why-i-love-comics:

Colleen Coover and the wonderful women of Marvel

from Girl Comics #1-3

written and drawn by Colleen Coover


"I have gotten so many letters from girls and boys who were so excited and proud to see a Black woman performing one of their favorite characters, “Elphaba”, in the musical Wicked. I was in Wicked for nearly 2 and a half years and I learned so much during that time.. .it wasn’t always easy and I was so busy in my own experience of working at the Gershwin theatre that I didn’t truly imagine so many kids would be inspired. 
"Oh, but the letters flew in, the artwork the fan sites, all the love that said "We’re so proud of you!" and "We can do it too!" I found out over the years that these things have meant alot to young people of color. "
- Actress Saycon Sengbloh, on being the first black ”Elphaba” in Wicked on Broadway.

"I have gotten so many letters from girls and boys who were so excited and proud to see a Black woman performing one of their favorite characters, “Elphaba”, in the musical Wicked. I was in Wicked for nearly 2 and a half years and I learned so much during that time.. .it wasn’t always easy and I was so busy in my own experience of working at the Gershwin theatre that I didn’t truly imagine so many kids would be inspired.

"Oh, but the letters flew in, the artwork the fan sites, all the love that said "We’re so proud of you!" and "We can do it too!" I found out over the years that these things have meant alot to young people of color. "

- Actress Saycon Sengbloh, on being the first black ”Elphaba” in Wicked on Broadway.

alonglineofbread:

thatcorbincrow:

IMAGINE BIOLUMINESCENT MERMAIDS

IMAGINE MERMAIDS WITH SYMBIOTIC RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHER ANIMALS

IMAGINE WHALE SIZED MERMAIDS IN THE ARCTIC CIRCLE

IMAGINE TINY TROPICAL SEAHORSE MERMAIDS

IMAGINE MERMAIDS WITH SCALES ALL OVER THEIR BODIES

IMAGINE SHARK MERMAIDS HUNTING WITH ACTUAL SHARKS

IMAGINE MERMAIDS THAT USE THEIR COLOR/TEXTURE FOR CAMOUFLAGE

IMAGINE JELLYFISH MERMAIDS

IMAGINE A SPERM WHALE MERMAID FIGHTING A GIANT SQUID MERMAID

IMAGINE MERMAIDS

image

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bow-down-to-bowie:


Bowie, who reported to the set in early June, also had to learn how to act with Labyrinth’s elaborate puppets. He found himself especially troubled by scenes with Hoggle, whose mouth opened and closed in front of him, but whose voice came from Brian Henson, sitting just offstage, speaking into a microphone and performing Hoggle’s mouth remotely with a waldo. “Once I’d overcome the disorientation,” laughed Bowie, “we all got along great!” “[Bowie] has been wonderful to work with,” Jim wrote privately, “and has added a truly magical spark as Jareth.” Jim also respected Bowie’s songwriting, giving Bowie—as he had Paul Williams —”a completely free hand” with the songs. While Bowie winkingly described Jareth as “a spoiled child, vain and temperamental, kind of like a rock ‘n’ roll star,” Jim found Bowie himself to be anything but spoiled or temperamental. “[He’s] a very normal well-grounded straightforward person,” said Jim. John Henson, who visited the set with a friend, was starstruck by Bowie, who greeted the twenty-year-old while still dressed as Jareth. When Bowie, finally out of makeup, sought John out at the end of the day, prowling the Elstree lobby in a bright red jacket, John was so awed by the sight of the musician that he and his friend ducked out of the studio without being seen. 
"Supposedly, David Bowie went around looking for us for about an hour after," said John sheepishly. "But we were gone!" For his part, Bowie was impressed by Jim, who seemed constantly in motion, yet oddly unaffected by his own crazy schedule. "Jim is undoubtedly the most unflappable guy I’ve ever encountered in any profession," said Bowie admiringly. "I just can’t believe his capacity for work. For instance, he would finish shooting for the week on Labyrinth in London, catch an airplane to New York, work … over the weekend, then catch a plane back to London Sunday night and be at the studios early on Monday morning…. He’s desperately work-conscious but he seems to love it all. His calm spirit made the whole film a pleasure to work on, not just for me, but for the entire cast and crew." 

Excerpt from the book Jim Henson: The Biography by Brian Jay Jones.

bow-down-to-bowie:

Bowie, who reported to the set in early June, also had to learn how to act with Labyrinth’s elaborate puppets. He found himself especially troubled by scenes with Hoggle, whose mouth opened and closed in front of him, but whose voice came from Brian Henson, sitting just offstage, speaking into a microphone and performing Hoggle’s mouth remotely with a waldo. “Once I’d overcome the disorientation,” laughed Bowie, “we all got along great!” “[Bowie] has been wonderful to work with,” Jim wrote privately, “and has added a truly magical spark as Jareth.” Jim also respected Bowie’s songwriting, giving Bowie—as he had Paul Williams —”a completely free hand” with the songs. While Bowie winkingly described Jareth as “a spoiled child, vain and temperamental, kind of like a rock ‘n’ roll star,” Jim found Bowie himself to be anything but spoiled or temperamental. “[He’s] a very normal well-grounded straightforward person,” said Jim. John Henson, who visited the set with a friend, was starstruck by Bowie, who greeted the twenty-year-old while still dressed as Jareth. When Bowie, finally out of makeup, sought John out at the end of the day, prowling the Elstree lobby in a bright red jacket, John was so awed by the sight of the musician that he and his friend ducked out of the studio without being seen. 

"Supposedly, David Bowie went around looking for us for about an hour after," said John sheepishly. "But we were gone!" For his part, Bowie was impressed by Jim, who seemed constantly in motion, yet oddly unaffected by his own crazy schedule. "Jim is undoubtedly the most unflappable guy I’ve ever encountered in any profession," said Bowie admiringly. "I just can’t believe his capacity for work. For instance, he would finish shooting for the week on Labyrinth in London, catch an airplane to New York, work … over the weekend, then catch a plane back to London Sunday night and be at the studios early on Monday morning…. He’s desperately work-conscious but he seems to love it all. His calm spirit made the whole film a pleasure to work on, not just for me, but for the entire cast and crew." 

Excerpt from the book Jim Henson: The Biography by Brian Jay Jones.